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Top destinations in Fuerteventura

Tarajalejo
Caleta de Fuste
Corralejo
Costa Calma

Popular things to do in Fuerteventura

Catamaran sailing - private charter 3h (Lagoon 380)
Catamaran sailing - private charter 3h (Lagoon 380)
Catamaran sailing - private charter 3h (Lagoon 380) 3 hours
Enjoy this amazing catamaran sailing getaway that ensures complete privacy for you and your loved ones. Sail around Lobos Island or opt for an itinerary tailored to your personal preference. Morning and afternoon sessions available.
Price from: €350.00
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Jetski Safari in Southern Fuerteventura
Jetski Safari in Southern Fuerteventura
Jetski Safari in Southern Fuerteventura 30 minutes
Enjoy a 30 or 60 minutes jetski safari and explore the beautifully rugged southeastern landscapes of Fuerteventura from a different perspective. No driving license required.
Price from: €70.00
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Surf lessons in Fuerteventura (1 to 5 days)
Surf lessons in Fuerteventura (1 to 5 days)
Surf lessons in Fuerteventura (1 to 5 days) 2.5 hours
After learning about the theory side of surfing and a stretching session, we will head for the water where you will put what you learned into practice. All levels available. Gears, transfer to surf spots, a small snack and water included.
Price from: €45.00
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Stand Up Paddle (SUP) courses
Stand Up Paddle (SUP) courses
Stand Up Paddle (SUP) courses 1.5 hours
Learn Stand Up Paddle (SUP) while holidaying in Fuerteventura - the perfect place to practice water sports thanks to its year round mild weather. Suitable for beginners and advanced SUPfers.
Price from: €30.00
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Surf Camp 1 or 2 weeks (Cotillo Ocean View)
Surf Camp 1 or 2 weeks (Cotillo Ocean View)
Surf Camp 1 or 2 weeks (Cotillo Ocean View) 1 week
For maximum learning why not join a surf camp, where you will surf everyday and hangout with the like-minded people. 1 and 2 weeks surf camp staying at Cotillo Ocean View.
Price from: €450.00
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Surf Camp 1 or 2 weeks (Hotel Caleta Garden)
Surf Camp 1 or 2 weeks (Hotel Caleta Garden)
Surf Camp 1 or 2 weeks (Hotel Caleta Garden) 1 week
For maximum learning why not join a surf camp, where you will surf everyday and hangout with the like-minded people. 1 and 2 weeks surf camp staying at Hotel Caleta Garden.
Price from: €420.00
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Surf Camp 1 or 2 weeks (Bronce Mar Beach)
Surf Camp 1 or 2 weeks (Bronce Mar Beach)
Surf Camp 1 or 2 weeks (Bronce Mar Beach) 1 week
For maximum learning why not join a surf camp, where you will surf everyday and hangout with the like-minded people. 1 and 2 weeks surf camp staying at Bronce Mar Beach.
Price from: €530.00
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Surf Camp 1 or 2 weeks (Hotel Elba Castillo)
Surf Camp 1 or 2 weeks (Hotel Elba Castillo)
Surf Camp 1 or 2 weeks (Hotel Elba Castillo) 1 week
For maximum learning why not join a surf camp, where you will surf everyday and hangout with the like-minded people. 1 and 2 weeks surf camp staying at Hotel Elba Castillo.
Price from: €450.00
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Tour and activity categories in Fuerteventura

Jet ski
Jet ski
Boat trips
Boat trips
Sightseeing Tours
Sightseeing Tours
Deep Sea Fishing
Deep Sea Fishing
Jeep Safari
Jeep Safari
Private Charter
Private Charter
Surfing
Surfing
Quad/ buggy
Quad/ buggy

Travel Inspirations - Fuerteventura

Fuerteventura island lies just 100 kilometres from Morocco’s Cape Juby. In many ways, the landscape of this Canary island feels more African, than Hispanic. Its lunar landscapes are dotted with bright coloured volcano cones and whitewashed flat-roofed houses, serving as just one example of the island’s exotic characteristics. Often referred to as ‘the island of magnificent beaches’, Fuerteventura  has long been a perennial favourite amongst beachcombers and surfers alike. You can also indulge in its dramatic coastlines, trek across the crimson scrublands of its interior, or live la vida loca at the resorts of Corralejo and Morro Jable, which lie at opposite ends of the island. The former also boasts the famous sand dune beaches at the Natural Park of Corralejo along the northeastern coast. If seeking charming fishing village feel, fresh seafood and wild beaches, make sure to visit El Cotillo. With much of its eastern coast standing in the face of Atlantic trade winds,  Fuerteventura  is arguably the most popular island in the archipelago for wind sports. For any wind junkies, Playa Sotavento de Jandía, found along the Jandía Peninsula, is the pick of the bunch and also hosts the Windsurf & PKRA Kiteboard World Cup each year. The coast also contains a smattering of harbour towns which still contribute heavily to the island’s traditional fishing economy. If you want to try some of the local cuisine, be sure to visit the historic seaside town of Gran Tarajal, which lays claim to being the last ‘Spanish’ town on the island. Culture and history enthusiasts are also spoilt for choice. If looking for the authentic Canarian experience, you only need to venture inland to find picturesque villages and towns. Often agricultural, these abodes embody a traditional and unequivocally Mediterranean lifestyle. The two former capitals of  Fuerteventura , Betancuria and La Oliva, are highly recommended. For the more intrepid traveller, the dramatic hamlet Cofete, found on the western part of the Jandía peninsula, is a must. It can only be reached by car, through a rocky drive across the cliff trails from Morro Jable . If you do muster up the courage, you will be rewarded with breathtaking coastal panoramas, and the chance to witness the eerie Villa Winter. The villa is the former home of a mysterious German engineer. To this day the house is the at the centre of many conspiracy theories. These range from the idea that there were secret alliances with Franco there, to the suggestion that it was once a halfway house for fleeing Nazi war criminals. If you choose to island hop during your holiday in  Fuerteventura , Isla de los Lobos with its bird species and surfing hot spots, is only 15 minutes boat ride away from the port of  Corralejo . Alternatively, regular ferries take you to Playa Blanca of Lanzarote island in about half an hour. Whatever you choose to do, you will almost certainly be greeted warmly by the island’s inhabitants (the Majoreros), countless windmills and believe it or not, roundabouts!
Overview In the heart of Fuerteventura lies the pretty and lush town of Betancuria. This former capital of Fuerteventura  was declared Parque Natural de Betancuria (Betancuria Natural Park) due to its fascinating landscapes, biodiversity as well as its historical significance. A visit to this oldest town of the island is a must, especially if you would like to see the former Fuerteventura  that existed before the advent of tourism and five star hotels. Fascinating architecture lines the windy cobbled streets; perhaps most interesting is the ruin of the first Franciscan convent of the Canary Islands . The various old buildings and museums give a great insight into the Betancuria of old. There are a couple of vantage points along FV-30 (towards Antigua town) with stunning views of the Betancuria terrain, adored with hills and ravines. It is highly recommended that you take the time to experience this timeless town during your stay in  Fuerteventura . History As the former capital of Fuerteventura , Betancuria has a colourful and turbulent history. The town itself and the indigenous people that once lived here have endured imperialist attacks from Europeans, and vengeful invasions at the hands of the Berbers. Today, Betancuria is quintessentially Fuerteventurian and protected as an area of geomorphological and ethnographic significance . Betancuria was founded during the Castilian invasion in 1404 by the Norman Conqueror, Jean de Béthencourt; and named after him. The once thriving capital of Fuerteventura  was home to numerous Castilian noblemen, renowned soldiers and the first church of the island, Iglesia de Santa María de Betancura. Its distance from the coast led the locals to believe that the town would be less vulnerable to attacks from pirates. However, many people from North Africa were captured and made to work as slaves on the island. This resulted in Betancuria being raided several times in retaliation by the Moors and the Berbers of northern Africa. During the raids endured by Betancuria, the Moroccans captured 600 prisoners and forced them to work as slaves for the aristocratic Berber families. In the mid 15th century after the wars between the Spanish and the Berbers had settled, the Majoreros led an uprising against the Spanish. However, they were unsuccessful in regaining their rights as the original inhabitants of the island. These tumultuous times were followed by the unsuccessful attempts of invasion by the British, who were defeated in the Battle of Tamasite in 1740. From the 19th century, Betancuria slowly lost its power to other towns due to economy development and as a result, people began to migrate towards the coast. Betancuria officially denounced its title as the capital of Fuerteventura  in 1834, ceding the title to La Oliva, which itself later gave up the title, now held by Puerto del Rosario . Culture Betancuria is steeped in Majorero culture, which you can learn about in its the various museums. Furthermore, the culture of the descendants of the Spanish that now inhabit the islands is reflected in Betancuria's arts and crafts. During fiesta season, ensembles of local musicians fill the streets with the sounds of traditional music. Music is an integral part of Canarian culture and present at all occasions. Religion is very important in this small town due to it being home to the first convent in the Canaries, and most of the locals practice Catholicism.  Economy The once affluent area of Betancuria built its economy through farming of cereals and livestock. Since the European colonialists won the battle against the indigenous people, little changed on the island until the 1980s. In the 1960s tourism was first permitted on the Canary Islands , but the boom did not hit Fuerteventura  and Betancuria until two decades later. The cobbled streets that meander through the town imply that the place was once very prosperous, but due to lack of economy development, the locals began to migrate to the coast and La Oliva where the soil was more fertile. Today Betancuria relies mainly on tourism with its museums, restaurants and shops providing an income for the locals. Sights   The Iglesia de Santa María church is an ideal starting point to explore the historical centre of Betancuria. Absorb the Canarian atmosphere while admiring the architectural and old buildings the former capital of Fuerteventura  has to offer. There are also a couple of museums worth visiting (see Museums). If you have a car, it is worth venturing northward of Betancuria, where you can see the ruins of Convento de San Buenaventura as well as be rewarded with amazing views along FV-30. Iglesia de Santa María (church) Iglesia de Santa María de Betancuria was the first church on the island of Fuertaventura, and was responsible for converting many Majoreros to Christianity. The church is a mixture of extremely interesting baroque, renaissance and gothic architecture. This is because it took over 100 years to build and was destroyed in a fire during an invasion of the Berbers in 1593. However, specific aspects of the church are original, such as the bell tower. The cathedral has a pretty courtyard and the white washed walls complement the mountainous topography that dominates the landscape. Unusually there a number of altars beautifully decorated with painted baroque designs. The church was consecrated as a cathedral in 1496 and appointed a bishop by Pope Martin V. The cathedral now also features museum, which is a short walk away. Address: Calle del Alcalde Carmelo Silvera, 35637 Betancuria, Fuerteventura  island. Opening hours: Monday- Saturday 10:00 to 16:00 Admission fee: €1.50 (including entrance to the Museum of Sacred Art) Casa de Santa María Casa Santa María is a 17th century country house located within the beautiful surroundings of Betancuria historic centre. The building has been lovingly renovated in a traditional Canarian style by a German designer and photographer, Reiner Loos. There is a museum and craft centre with an impressive display of farming tools from the past century, as well as live demonstration of weave and craft work. There is a large audiovisual widescreen presentation on Fuerteventura , and for those wanting an extra dimension of the island's underwater world, a small 3D cinema is available. The building boasts a café, a restaurant, and a souvenir shop. A 4-star hotel of the same name is anticipated to open in 2013 within the same area. Address: Casa Santa María, Plaza Santa María 1, 35637 Betancuria, Fuerteventura  island (opposite the church) Telephone: +34 928 878 036 Entrance fee: Adult €6, under 10 years €3 Ruins of Convento de San Buenaventura Built in 1496, San Buenaventura was the first monastery in the whole of the Canary Islands . The convent now stands as a ruin as it was abandoned in 1937 following an order from Queen Isabella II of Spain. Next to the old ruin is a small church belonging to the convent called San Buenaventura. This lovely little church has undergone extensive restoration on the outside and is truly a magnificent sight. However, it is kept locked and completely empty. This site is of profound historical importance and is well worth a visit. The convent and the church can be found on the northern outskirt of Betancuria. Mirador Morro Velosa (vantage point) On the FV-30 road towards Antigua, north of Betancuria, Mirador Morro Velosa is a vantage point giving panoramic views across the region. There is also a cafe/bar at the view point offering drinks and quick bite to eat. The vantage point opens only five days a week but do not be disappointed if you arrive outside the opening days/ hours, there are plenty of opportunity to witness the beautiful landscape along the scenic route between the two towns. Alternatively, stopped by the Mirador Corrales de Guize for equally breathtaking vantage point. Direction: Roaf FV-30 between Betancuria and Antigua. Opening hours: Tuesday to Saturday 10:00 to 18:00, Sunday and Monday closed. Mirador Corrales de Guize (vantage point) This vantage point at altitude of 600 metres offers beautiful scenery of Betancuria's landscape on FV-30. Adorned with two giant bronze statues of the island's natives - Guize and Ayoze, this view point is pretty difficult to miss. On the other side of the road is a signboard explaining the mountains and valley which are bounded within the protected Betancuria Rural Park, as well as flora and fauna contained within the park. On a clear day, one could witness the valley of El Rincón, the village of Betancuria and the peaks of Morro Velosa, La Atalaya and Morro de la Cruz. Direction: Road FV-30 between Betancuria and Antigua. Museums Museum of Sacred Art is worth a visit for those who are interested in the religious art. Alternatively, the Archaeological Museum housed within an antique house tell the stories of how the native inhabitants used to live. Museo de Arte Sacro (Museum of Sacred Art) The Museum of Sacred Art houses a number of important religious relics and artefacts that were once kept in the monastery and in the cathedral. Admission to this museum is included in the entrance fee to the Iglesia de Santa María, which is a short walk away. Address: Calle Alcalde Carmelo Silvera s/n, 35637 Betancuria, Fuerteventura  island. Telephone: +34 928 878 003 Opening hours: Monday – Saturday 10:00 - 17:00 Casa Museo de Betancuria/ El Museo Arqueológico A variety of architectural artefacts from various excavations in Fuertaventura are on display here, and one can learn about the Majoreros’ way of life. The museum includes five spacious halls and is categorised into three sections: archaeology, ethnography and palaeontology. Address: Calle Roberto Roldán, 35637 Betancuria, Fuerteventura  island. Telephone: +34 928 878 241 Opening hours: Tuesday to Saturday 10:00 – 17:00, Sunday 11:00 – 14:00 on Sunday, Monday closed. Admission fee: €2 Festivals There are many festivals held in Betancuria, following are two of the celebrations typical to this former capital of Fuerteventura . Día de San Buenaventura Taking place on the 14th July this annual festival is in celebration of the patron saint of Betancuria. This festival which started in the middle of the 15th century features huge feasts, locals dressed in traditional costumes, street musicians and local artisans displaying their work. Nuestra Señora de la Concepción Held on the 8th of December is a fiesta celebrating the immaculate conception of Jesus Christ. Full of local characteristics, it is extremely important to the religious inhabitants of Betancuria, and a huge event in the town's calendar. Restaurants There are several restaurants located within the historical centre of Betancuria offering delicious Canarian dishes. A couple of them are housed within some of the oldest buildings around, offering visitor an unique dining atmosphere. Casa Princess Arminda Located behind the town's church in one of the oldest buildings in Fuerteventura  is Casa Princess Arminda restaurant. It offers three different patios (one overlooking the tower of the church) where you can enjoy authentic reasonably priced Canarian dishes while soaking the sun and the beautiful scenery of the historical town centre. Among the specialties are goat stew, goat cheese, and home made desserts. Address: Calle Juan de Bethancourt 2, 35637 Betancuria, Fuerteventura  island (behind the church). Telephone: +34 928 878 979/ 638 802 780 Casa Santa María Restaurant Forming part of the Casa Santa María, this restaurant serves food and drinks of extraordinary quality within a beautiful 17th century building. On offer is an extensive menu of traditional yet creative cuisine and wine pairing. If you like goat meat, try the signature dish of oven-baked young goat meat served with rosemary sauce, vegetables and potatoes. House specialty dishes priced at €22.50. Address: Casa Santa María, Plaza Santa María 1, 35637 Betancuria, Fuerteventura  island (opposite the church) Telephone: +34 928 878 282 Val Tarajal This friendly restaurant serves a delicious array of Canarian cuisine such as soups, stews, and goat meats. Adress: Calle Roberto Roldán s/n, 35637 Betancuria, Fuerteventura  island. Telephone: +34 928 878 007 Nightlife Betancuria is not the best place to come to if you are looking for a night on the tiles. However, there are various pubs and restaurants serving alcohol if you would like to enjoy a drink whilst absorbing the historical ambience of this peaceful town.  Shopping There are a few shops in Betancuria, selling mainly crafts and potteries of local artisans. Some of these shops are located inside the various museums and Casa Rurales of the area.
Overview Cofete is a remote and mysterious coastal hamlet which lies on the western part of the Jandía peninsula, on  Fuerteventura  island. It is a rather isolated area of the island, and comprises of picturesque scenery which can be seen from its numerous hiking paths. The sweeping beach of Playa de Cofete has also been deemed one of the most scenic beaches on the island. There is an air of intrigue that surrounds Cofete, as according to legend, the Villa Winter, was used as a bolthole for fugitive Nazi war criminals. Due to this, many conspiracy theorists make pilgrimages to the area. If contemplating a visit to this fascinating coastal hamlet, be ready for a tedious car journey on dirt roads. Alternatively, for the more adventurous wanderers, a cross country hiking trek from Morro Jable. How to get there Starting from Morro Jable, follow the sign-posted road for Cofete for approximately 10 km until you come to a fork in the road. Heading right, you will then find yourself on a narrow track which snakes up and along the cliff tops. From here, you can make your way down to the village, towards the Playa de Cofete beach. Alternatively, you can hike across the old herd tracks from Morro Jable (see Activities section). Sights Famed for its breathtaking landscapes and rugged coastline covered with white powdery sands; the mysterious Villa Winter is probably the only non-natural sight in Cofete. Villa Winter Standing at the foot of Mount Jandía, the Villa Winter has been the subject of many urban legends. Originally built in the 1930s for the German engineer, Gustav Winter, the building was modelled on its original 19th century Black Forest antecedent and was fitted with gothic arches, a turret and even a familial coat of arms embossed above the front door. However, it is the alleged dark secrets contained within its parameters, rather than the architecture, which continue to intrigue the intrepid tourists that visit cross the bumpy dust tracks to reach it. Legend has it that Winter was in cahoots with both Franco and Hitler, who had become allies after Hitler’s support of the Nationalists during the Civil War. Tales soon spread of German submarines mooring off the southwest coastline; an underground tunnel system housing various espionage communications; concentration camp prisoners were shipped in to complete the construction of the town’s port and roads; and that it was used as a halfway house for Nazi war criminals fleeing for South America. Activities Cofete is known for its rugged, remote coastlines, and breathtaking scenery. As a result, hiking has proved to be one of the most popular activities amongst tourists visiting the area. Hiking Many visitors choose to pop on their walking boots during their visit, and indulge in a challenging, but picturesque trek across the peninsula. The walk normally takes around two hours, and involves following a dirt track from Morro jable to Punta de Jandía. On the walk, you will see dazzling panoramic views across the coast, along with rare flowers, cacti, lizards and birds. In the upper hills it can get cold, so don’t forget to bring a coat. To reach the starting point, head out of town (it’s best to take a car for this initial stage) along the road that leads to Cofete and Punta de Jandía, until you come to a sign on the right denoting Red de Caminos de Pájara Gran Vallee – Cofete. The trail begins here. Beaches There is one main beach which runs alongside the coast of Cofete. Playa de Cofete beach Covered with fine white sands, the stretch of beach is quite popular with nudists as a result of it seclusion and remoteness. However, due to the powerful swells and currents of its waters, swimming and water sports are not advised. The journey to the beach is tedious but negotiable by car, if drive slowly and with care. See How to get there for more information. If you decide to take a stroll, you will come across a mysterious cemetery that looks onto the beach. Rumour has it, that several of the German workers, brought over to construct the region’s infrastructure, fell to their grisly demises off the steep cliff edges. Restaurants There is one main eatery in Cofete. Restaurante Cofete This wind-whipped eatery was apparently popular with German workers during Herr Winter’s time, and still contains a significant Teutonic patronage today. The restaurant serves a decent selection of drinks and snacks, as well as local dishes which include fresh fish and goat. Mains range from €6-12 per person. Address: Cofete, s/n, Fuerteventura  island. Telephone: +34 928 174 243 Opening hours: 11:00 - 19:00        
Overview Situated on the northwest tip of  Fuerteventura  island, El Cotillo is a small town with plenty of character. From the old harbour, to its sprawl of beaches and mystical lagoons, this town boasts an intriguing old-world charm. Despite the lack of tourism in certain parts of the town, particularly in the north, its serenity and unpretentiousness continues to attract an eclectic crowd of bohemians, surfers and peace-seekers, who have been visiting since the late 1960s. History Before the Spanish conquest in the 15th century, El Cotillo was the seat of power for the aboriginal chiefs of Maxorata and so the northern kingdom of Fuerteventura . Since its subjugation by Spanish forces, the town has remained relatively peaceful despite garnering particular interest from Barbary pirates and English invaders in the 18th century. The  Castillo del Tostón , constructed in 1743, was initially utilised as a defence tower to guard against such attacks, but this soon gave away to the peace and tranquillity which still envelops El Cotillo to this day. Culture As a former fishing hamlet, El Cotillo’s real character lies in the fact that it is not even slightly pretentious. Beautifully Mediterranean, locals enjoy a relaxed pace of life, punctuated by a daily siesta. However don’t mistake its languidness for slothfulness- fishing is still a big business here. El Cotillo's coterie of experienced fishermen, are often seen traipsing from the harbour each morning to transport their latest catches to the local restaurants. Economy El Cotillo’s economy is predominantly generated by fishing. In recent years, a number of low-rise apartment blocks have also sprung up, catering the steadily growing influx of holiday makers. How to get there By Bus: You can catch the Tiadhe bus number 7 from  Puerto del Rosario , which runs from 10:00 until 19:00 (three daily), and vice versa from 06:45 until 17:00 (three daily). Journeys both ways cost €3.95 and takes about 45 minutes. Tiadhe bus number 8 has an hourly service from  Corralejo , running from 09:00 until 21:00, costing €2.80. The return service from El Cotillo operates from 08:00am until 20:00 (hourly service except at 2.00pm) and costs €2.90. By Car: If driving from the airport, take the FV-2 motorway before turning onto the FV-10, just outside Puerto del Rosario , which runs directly to El Cotillo. The journey takes approximately 45 minutes. If travelling from Corralejo , take the FV-1 out of town before joining the FV-101 for El Cotillo, going via Lajares. The 20km journey takes approximately 20 minutes. Sights This former fishing village itself is the main attraction of El Cotillo. The old harbour is perfect for a relaxing stroll, you can see locals fishing or taking a refreshing dip in the sea water. The Old Harbour If looking for some peace and quiet, relaxing by the town’s atmospheric old harbour is a must. Whilst watching the sizable swells of the sea, you can imagine the masterful seamanship of past years. Back when the harbour was a commercial port, sailors would regularly direct their vessels through the narrow quay on almost insurmountable waves. As a result, the inscription on the adjacent rock face, reads:  “Viva la Virgen del Buen Viaje” (“Long Live the Virgin of Good Travel”). The surrounding area is also studded by a number of picturesque bars and restaurants. Castillo del Tóston (fort) Located near the new harbour, this small circular fort originally stood as a means of defence against possible attacks from misanthropic seamen. Nowadays it is used to mount art exhibitions, although there still sits a display of arsenal dating back to the town’s more precarious days. If your Spanish is lacking, there are information leaflets printed in English. While there, make sure to climb to the top of the tower for breathtaking panoramic views of the nearby white-sanded beaches. Faro del Tóston (Lighthouse) The Tóston lighthouse can be found north of El Cotillo township, past Los Lagos. Some section of the journey will be of dirt route but is easily negotiable. This iconic structure also houses the Museo de la Pesca Tradicional (Museum of Traditional Fishing). Directions: take the coastal road towards north of El Cotillo, past Los Lagos. Museums There are often exhibitions held at the Castillo del Tóston and if you are visiting the lighthouse, don't forget to check out the Museum of Traditional Fishing contained within it. Museo de la Pesca Tradicional (Museum of Traditional Fishing) Museo de la Pesca Tradicional (Museum of Traditional Fishing) is housed within the iconic Faro del Tóston Lighthouse. Here you will learn about the history of traditional fishing in the island through exhibition and audiovisual presentation. There is also a small shop at your If museum is not your thing, there is an outdoor cafe behind the museum. It has transparent wind shields so you can enjoy your beverages and the sea view at ease. Only a few metres away from the water, you won't find many cafes closer to the sea than this one! Directions: take the coastal road towards north of El Cotillo, past Los Lagos. Opening hours: Tuesday - Saturday 10:00 to 18:00, closed on Sunday and Monday. Activities A haven for watersports, El Cotillo has the perfect conditions for everything from kite surfing to snorkelling. Surfing El Cotillo is a surfers' paradise. How often do you get to ride consistent, long rolling waves within a picturesque surrounding of palm trees and almost-deserted white sandy mounds? There are many surf spots along El Cotillo's coastline to suit all levels of ability, whilst the all-year warm weather and water temperature means no serious disruption for keen surfers. There are surf shops offering courses, board rental, and surf packages. Surf camps are also available and some even incorporate Yoga routine into their daily schedule. Kite Surfing (Kite Boarding) If you’re intrepid enough to let yourself be at the complete mercy of the winds, why not try a spot of kite surfing? Fuerteventura  being the 'strong wind' island, is also well-known for its 10 months worth of sunshine each year. These, along with the endless stretches of white sands and turquoise waters, make Fuerteventura  the best island for wind sports. El Cotillo is an emerging hot spot and therefore is still relatively uncrowded. There are kitesurf centres and kite schools offering rentals, repair services and a variety of courses (from teaser course to windsurf camps). Accommodations can also be arranged. Diving and Snorkelling The clear waters and white sandy floor of make El Cotillo ideal for snorkelling and diving. However, there aren't many designated dive spots in El Cotillo, and they are difficult to find. There's a couple of surfing cum diving shops in El Cotillo offering dive courses here, but for actual diving trips, you will most likely be directed to the more popular dive spots around Corralejo  and Isla de los Lobos. Beaches There are several main beaches in the area which are popular with locals, tourists and surfers alike. If you have your own vehicle (a sturdy one!), we recommend venturing along the dirt road connecting El Cotillo and Corralejo  on the north coast. You will be rewarded with a series of remote wild beaches and excellent scenery. Playas del Castillo, Aljibe and Águila Beaches of El Cotillo are mainly an extension of fine white dunes, which means they are often wide and long. Well preserved due to the efforts of the local council, the town has the prodigal luxury of three beaches to its name which snake southwards. Playa del Castillo is a beach which contains a cluster of unique sculptures designed by French artist Kadir Attia, meanwhile Playa del Algibe de la Cueva and Playa del Águila are particularly remote and windswept, ideal for wind sports. Las Lagos North of the original kernel of the town’s fishing village lies Las Lagos: the lagoons. These contain shallow pools which are accompanied by a remote and rather scrubby desert landscape. This is one of the more developed beaches, with many apartments and tourist facilities built nearby. Festivals There is one fiesta in particular which is worth incorporating into your visit to El Cotillo. Fuertemúsica (Fuerteventura Music Festival) Held in early July, this lively festival draws in a motley crew of international artists ranging from traditional Flamenco to dub and reggae troupes. The big stage is set up in the lagoon area. Restaurants Despite being a small town, El Cotillo has an abundance of restaurants with ample opportunity to dine well, even if on a budget. If looking for a relaxed ambience and a welcome dose of authenticity, head to the old harbour. Casta Rustica With an open kitchen allowing you a preview of Canarian cooking, prepare to gorge on any number of reasonably priced dishes including the inevitable seafood smorgasbord and mouth-watering steaks. Served by welcoming and accommodating staff, always at hand to fill your glass, starters also include delicious Canarian wrinkled potatoes and goat’s cheese. Address: Calle de la Constitución 1, 35650 El Cotillo, Fuerteventura  island. Telephone: +34 928 538 728 Mare Alta restaurant This little tapas haven offers a wide selection of tasty and well-prepared tapas. Whether you are after a quick bite or a meal, this friendly restaurant with informal indoor and outdoor seating are sure to please. With reasonably priced dishes, it is hard to pass on the selection of yummy desserts on its menu. Address: Calle 3. abril de 1978, 35650 El Cotillo, Fuerteventura  island. El Toscon Bar and Restaurant Whether you have been away from home too long and missing the hearty home made European dishes, or just want a nice chill out drink with excellent view of the harbour, look no further than El Toscon. Run by a friendly British couple, this little gem can be found at the old harbour of El Cotillo. Offering tasty home cooked meals, a good selection of beverages, and terrace seating, it is an ideal place to spend the evening. Address: Old harbour, 35650 El Cotillo, Fuerteventura  island. Nightlife Catering to a more tranquil set, El Cotillo doesn’t have a vast nightlife, but has many bars tending to be languid affairs where locals chew the fat over a glass of cold beer. Head to El Toscon for a drink at its habour view terrace and watch the sun set. If looking for something a little more hedonistic, head for the resort of Corralejo , 20km away, which is arguably the island’s party capital.          
Overview This beautiful town is located on the east coast of the Tuineje municipality, within  Fuerteventura island. Unique and unpretentious, Gran Tarajal is often referred to as the last authentically ‘Spanish’ town on the island. As a hub of maritime and agricultural activity, its 7000 inhabitants are very proud of this peaceful town, which sits on the mouth of the Rio Gran Tarajal. The centre comprises of numerous steep and narrow streets built into the hillside, lined with quaint cafes and artisan shops served by friendly locals. Down below, lies a gorgeous seafront promenade which leads onto the black sandy beach of Playa de Gran Tarajal. Unlike the neighbouring resort of Las Playitas, this harbour town is still untouched by mass tourism. For those looking to escape thronged beaches and sample a more tranquil experience, Gran Tarajal is the perfect antidote. History For many years Gran Tarajal was Fuerteventura ’s principal harbour for the exportation of the island’s agricultural produce. Garnering a steadfast reputation as one of the most important ports in the archipelago, the town also drew considerable, if unwelcome, interest from Barbary pirates and conquistadors throughout the 17th and 18th centuries. The Gran Tarajal's bravest hour came in 1740 when locals withstood an attack from a British fleet looking to invade the island. Incredibly, the British, equipped with cannons and muskets, were defeated in what became known as the Battle of Tamasite, near the bay of Playa Gran Tarajal. Culture Gran Tarajal is noted for its hardworking ethic and as a result, reamins as one of the island’s principal production hotbeds. The fishing community, in particular, is a source of pride for the town. It is also not uncommon for jovial and engaging restaurateurs to stay open into the early hours in a haze of Sangria and storytelling, providing visitors with a wonderful example of the town’s undeniable Spanish identity. Economy Needless to say, fish is the town’s most-valued commodity. Cheeses and agricultural produce, namely tomatoes are also exported. How to get there By Bus: There are many buses (Tiadhe bus number 1 and 10) which run between Puerto del Rosario  and Morro Jable , you will have no problem getting to Gran Tarajal from these two resorts. Both lines stop at the airport en route, with bus number 1 offers more regular service. Tiadhe bus number 18 from Pájara also operates from 07:30 until 18:30, although the service is less frequent. There are also regular buses from neighbouring Las Playitas resort to Gran Tarajal, the Tiadhe bus number 12 runs from 06:45 until 21:00. By Car: If travelling from Corralejo or the airport, the simplest route would be to take the motorway FV-1, followed by FV-2 (from airport) heading south before turning off onto the FV-4 for Gran Tarajal. From the south ( Morro Jable ), head north on motorway FV-2, then follow sign onto FV-4 for Gran Tarajal. Sights With its unique history, Gran Tarajal boasts a plethora of old yet stunning bulidings. Gran Tarajal Church Built in 1879, the church was funded by a returning islander who had made his fortune in Cuba. Situated in the town’s central square, it is enclosed by an expansive grove of Canarian palm trees whose fronds are often used by local artisans to make baskets and Majorero straw hats. Adjacent to the church also sits an intriguing water fountain featuring the heads of six seahorses. Beaches There is one main beach in Gran Tarajal. Playa de Gran Tarajal beach Gran Tarajal's town is fronted by a curving bay of fine black sand. Approximately 1km in length, the beach is popular with swimmers, divers, windsurfers and kiteboarders drawn to its calm waters. As the sand can be clammy, especially during the heat of the summer, there are several public shower facilities dotted along the seafront, where you can wash off. Festivals From fishing competitions to lively re-enactments of past battles, there are numerous festivals which are worth incorporating into your visit. Open Internacional de Pesca de Altura de Canarias (Open International Deep Sea Fishing of the Canary Islands) In September the town attracts a number of visitors for the largest deep sea fishing contest in the Canary Islands. Held at the new harbour, fishermen from across the world can be heard in heated conversation trying to outdo each other. Competition is high, and in recent years, catches have included a blue marlin which weighed a staggering 380kg! Battle of Tamasite Re-enactment Over 250 years on from the victory of the poorly armed but lionhearted locals over the British, the battle is still a point of pride for their descendants, who celebrate through a lively re-enactment each October. Fiesta de la Juventud (Youth Festival) Held at the end of July as a means of celebrating juventud (youth), the celebrations are suitably lively and energetic, featuring concerts, fairs, games and dancing in both the town centre of Gran Tarajal and on the beach. Other Festivals February 2nd- Nuestra Señora de la Candelaria November 13th- San Diego de Alcalá Restaurants There are several charming restaurants to be found in the labyrinthine town centre of Gran Tarajal, serving local Canarian fare at more than reasonable prices. Unsurprisingly, seafood is the town’s speciality, seaweed in particular. La Parada Restaurante y Bar Serving traditional Spanish/Canarian dishes, including tapas and fish, at reasonable prices, this friendly restaurant and bar is located just a couple of minutes away from the Playa de Tarajal and promenade. It is also the perfect place for a cold beer and small bite to eat whilst watching the match with the locals on its big screen TV. Average price: €7.50 (including drink and coffee). Address: Calle Princesa Tamonante 18, 35200 Gran Tarajal, Tuineje , Fuerteventura  island. Telephone: +34 928 949 244 Opening hours: 07:00 - 01:00 (closed on Tuesdays)
Overview La Lajita is a small fishing village located on the east coast of the Pajara municipal in  Fuerteventura . During the day, La Lajita is a peaceful abode, with the residents busying themselves with fishing and daily chores. However, at night the town comes alive, as the locals gather for a drink after a hard day’s work. The La Lajita beach is made up of fine volcanic black sands, with pebbles further back. It is dotted with colourful fishing boats and the water here is clear. Next to the sea is a small white church, which fits perfectly into the panorama of the blue ocean. Although not especially big, La Lajita attracts tourists from all over the island to its Oasis Park: one of Europe’s biggest zoos and botanical gardens, where you can even ride with the camels. History La Lajita continues to be a fishing village today and became so around the 17 th century, with the installation of port ‘La Pared’. La Lajita is constantly growing, attracting a vast number of immigrants, and so the Government expanded the municipality. Whilst primarily a fishing village,  La Lajita today has also incorporated tourism into the area. Culture With 1700 inhabitants, La Lajita is a fairly small town. On entering the area, you will come across a number of modern, multi coloured houses, which juxtapose beautifully against the older buildings. From this, you can see straight away, that this town has a contemporary yet characteristic edge to it. The church of La Lajita is small, white, and modern. It sits on the beach front and looks very quaint and pretty against the backdrop of the blue ocean. Locals come here to pray and honour the Virgin Mary. Economy As La Lajita is a fishing village, the majority of its inhabitants make their living through fishing and associated trades. The Oasis Park also brings in many jobs to the town of La Lajita. In turn, tourism increases helping the local businesses to grow. How to get there By Bus: From Puerto del Rosario, the capital of Fuerteventura , you can take the Tiadhe bus number 10. This runs four times daily, from Monday to Sunday until 18:00. There are also the Tiadhe bus number 25 which goes from Morro Jable to La Lajita every hour from 06:00 until 00:15. From Tuineje, you can catch Tiadhe bus number 11 but bear in mind there’s only one departure a day at 08:00. By Car: If you are driving, La Lajita is located off of the FV-2 motorway on the east coast. Activities With a Camel Farm, and a variety of animals to see at the Oasis Park, La Lajita is a haven for animal lovers. Oasis Park Fuerteventura It is fair to say that the Oasis Park Fuerteventura is the top attraction in La Lajita. It is one of the largest zoos in Europe with a surface of 780,000 m². It also has a magnificent botanical garden (160,000 m²), which offers a camel safari adventure. When you arrive at Oasis Park Fuerteventura you are taken in by the array of palm trees and cacti. Over 6,800 species of floras from around the world were brought to the park to recreate a natural tropical habitat for the animals. Whether you enjoy seeing exotic birds and reptiles from various continents, or if crocodiles and chimpanzees are more your thing, the Oasis Park is sure to please everyone. Giraffes, kangaroos and giant American turtles are just a few of the species kept at the zoo. There are also a number of shows to see at the Oasis Park Fuerteventura including the reptile show, sea lion show and the parrot show. Admission is included in the ticket price, and a few lucky audience members might even get to take part in the show. The Camel Farm The Camel farm, which looks after over 450 camels, has been open to the public since 2003. Here, you will have the opportunity to see camels nursing their young and interacting with each other. The farm offers the camels a home to protect them from becoming extinct. Camel Safari On the camel Safari, you can ride a camel up to the hill for a spectacular view over La Lajita and the ocean, before returning to the park. There are 3 restaurants in Oasis Park Fuerteventura offering a variety of cuisines. Free car park and free shuttle services to/ from Corralejo , Caleta de Fuste and other main tourist spots are also available.    Address: Carretera Jandía, S/N, 35625 La Lajita, Pájara, Fuerteventura island. Telephone: +34 908 161 102 Opening hours: 09:00 to 18:00 Tickets: Oasis Park: Adult €25.20, Children (3-11 years) €16.20 Camel Safari: Adult €10.80, Children (3-11 years) €7.20 Lucha Canaria (Canarian Wrestling) Lucha Canaria (Canarian Wrestling) is one of the most popular Canarian sports. Wrestlers from the region come and train here every day. Competitions are held quite often and the locals love coming to cheer for their favourite wrestlers. In May, during a special celebration in honour of the Virgin Mary, the arena is lit up and decorated with flowers. Beaches The beach of La Lajita is ideal for a quick swim and a stroll while you explore this small fishing village. Playa La Lajita beach The beach is accessible via the plaza of La Lajita, past the church. Popular amongst the locals and tourists, the water is almost transparent and the black sand is fine and soft beneath your feet (though further back it is rougher on the feet with pebbles and small stones). The colourful fishing boats dotted along the shore also add to the charm of this fishing village. There are a few cafes at the beach front offering snacks and drinks. Festivals There is one main fiesta that takes place in La Lajita on an annual basis. Festival in Honour of the Virgin Mary Around the 2nd or 3rd week of April (dates vary each year), the Festival in Honour of the Virgin of Immaculate Conception (Virgin Mary) is held over a period of 7 days. The entire village is involved in the celebration with the roads being decorated with flowers. Every day there is a different activity going on during this peroid. Plays, traditional games, barbecues, and ring fights are just a few of the activities that the locals take part in. Restaurants Down every little lane and street you will find various restaurants offering fresh fish and typical Canarian cuisine. Nightlife The nightlife in La Lajita is minimal with local bars and salsa taverns. Here, you will be able to snack on some Canarian tapas and reasonably priced beers. The nearby town of Morro Jable (30 km), provides a more lively nightlife, with a wide choice of bars and clubs. The town is accessible from La Lajita via the Tiadhe bus number 25 or 10. Bear in mind that there’s a big gap between 00:15 and 06:00 for buses returning to La Lajita. Olympia Bar Here, you can grab a yummy cocktail by the beachfront. Address: Avenida Saladar, Morro Jable Centro Comercial, Playa Paradiso, 35625 Morro Jable, Fuerteventura  island. Telephone: +34 928 166 012 Opening hours: 10:00-01:00