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Top destinations in Tenerife

Playa de las Americas
Puerto de la Cruz
El Médano
Los Gigantes

Popular things to do in Tenerife

Freebird One 3 hours Sailing Experience
Freebird One 3 hours Sailing Experience
Freebird One 3 hours Sailing Experience 3 hours
On board the luxury Freebird One catamaran along the beautiful southwest coast of Tenerife island. See Mount Teide from boat, spot whales and dolphins, and take a swim or snorkel in the crystal clear waters. Crew speaks 10 languages.
Price from: €41.00
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Helicopter tour: south coast of Tenerife (20km)
Helicopter tour: south coast of Tenerife (20km)
Helicopter tour: south coast of Tenerife (20km) 10 minutes
A short and sweet 10 minutes helicopter exploring the south coast of Tenerife. Admire the charming fishing village of La Caleta, enjoy an aerial view of Playa de las Américas and Los Cristianos resorts. Distance: 20km.
Price from: €98.00
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Siam Park
Siam Park
Siam Park 1 day
Enjoy a fun-filled day at Siam Park - one of the best water theme park in Europe. From chillaxing Mai Tai ride to feeling the zero gravity on the vertical funnel of Dragon, there is something for the whole family.
Price from: €35.00
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La Gomera Bus Tour (north pick-up)
La Gomera Bus Tour (north pick-up)
La Gomera Bus Tour (north pick-up) 10 hours
A day trip on bus to La Gomera island for the amazing sceneries, Garajonay National Park (UNESCO's heritage site), the unique El Silbo whistle language and more!
Price from: €70.00
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Siam Park Ticket (bus option to Las Americas available)
Siam Park Ticket (bus option to Las Americas available)
Siam Park Ticket (bus option to Las Americas available) 1 day
From chillaxing Mai Tai ride to feeling the zero gravity on the vertical funnel of Dragon, there is something for the whole family in Siam Park - one of the best water theme park in Europe. Now with the bus service, you can visit Siam Park even if you are are staying in Puerto de la Cruz.
Price from: €35.00
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Tandem paragliding - Taganana, Tenerife
Tandem paragliding - Taganana, Tenerife
Tandem paragliding - Taganana, Tenerife 30 minutes
Gliding over the fantastic Taganana Valley, ravine, dramatic rock formations and quaint villages as you tandem paraglide above the undulating Anaga region.
Price from: €140.00
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Paragliding tandem in Tenerife: The Acentejo cliffs in Tacoronte
Paragliding tandem in Tenerife: The Acentejo cliffs in Tacoronte
Paragliding tandem in Tenerife: The Acentejo cliffs in Tacoronte 30 minutes
Join us for a tandem paragliding flight over the northwest regions of Tenerife: El Sauzal, Tacoronte and La Matanza with impressive view of Teide mountain.
Price from: €120.00
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Paragliding tandem from Ifonche­ to Costa Adeje
Paragliding tandem from Ifonche­ to Costa Adeje
Paragliding tandem from Ifonche­ to Costa Adeje 30 minutes
Launching from 1000 metres from Ifonche towards the southern coast of Tenerife, this paragliding ride offers you impressive aerial views over rocky landscape, gorge and mountain.
Price from: €140.00
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Tour and activity categories in Tenerife

Biking
Biking
Helicopter tours
Helicopter tours
Boat trips
Boat trips
Climbing
Climbing
Diving
Diving
Jet ski
Jet ski
Water sports
Water sports
Hiking
Hiking

Travel Inspirations - Tenerife

Fiesta del Cacharro, also more funnily known as the “junk” festival, is a celebration in honor of Saint Andrew. Taking place annually on the 29th of November, this festivity is very popular in the north of Tenerife island especially in the township of Puerto de la Cruz and Icod de los Vinos. This island festival is also closely coincide with the opening of wineries where wine are paired with clay-pot roasted chestnut and salted fish. On this day, young children and their not-so-young playful parents flock to the streets, fulling their string of “junks” behind as they run about. The objective was to create as much noise as possible to attract attention. Back in the 70s and 80s when the celebration was more splendour, you could see all sorts of “junks” being dragged use. From pots to washing machines and bathtubs... anything ridiculous and fun the locals could get hold of. Nowadays, the “junks” used are less extreme. Most often seen are tin cans being strung on a wire, not lacking in creativity nonetheless. Legend has it that making loud noise with pots help to scare off witches and bad spirits. Another tells that San Andrés was drunk a day after his celebration and had to be woken up by the sound of kids clanging pots. A more valid source states that back in the day, on the eve of Saint Andrew’s, wine makers would wash the wine barrels at the coast with sea water. They would roll the barrels down the hill creating massive noise, and this noise is what the children and youngsters are trying to reproduce nowadays, with anything they could collect days leading up to the celebration.
Overview Abades is known as the ‘ghost town’ of Tenerife due to the history of the lepers being buried here. All of the white houses here look the same with flat roofs and green windows. The streets are named after towns around the island such as Calle Fasnia, Calle Arafo and Calle Arico; and as Abades is a fishing village, a number of colourful fishing boats can be seen on the beach. There is a beautiful golden sand beach which is fantastic for diving or just relaxing and taking a dip in the ocean. There are a number of cafes and restaurants along the beach front which are perfect for a drink, light snack or delicious evening meal. History Leprosy was a big problem in the Canary Islands and in 1943, Abades was designated to keep lepers away from the rest of the population. A hospital, a crematorium and a church were built although the hospital was never finished and the idea was abandoned when drugs were created to heal the sick from leprosy. The resort was later used as a military training base. Since then, new white houses have been built on the hill and it often seems like a ghost town due to the quiet and serenity of the once disease stricken village. The lighthouse between Abades and El Poris de Abona was built in 1902 and replaced in 1978. The opening of the South Airport in November 1978 and the TF1 motorway had certainly triggered the development of Abades, followed by the 1986 Abades project. The town changed its name to Abades the same year and more public amenities were subsequently built.  Culture Abades is a very small village with only local residents and those who own holiday homes, mostly Germans, residing here. There is little going on in the town of Abades and is a peaceful place for residents without worrying too much about tourism. The church of Abades was built in 1987 and holds mass every fourth Saturday of the month at 8pm. Economy Abades is still an active fishing village as you can see by the small fishing boats by the beach. The village cafes are always full of fisherman and whilst Abades can be seen as a typical northern village, fishing is the basis of its economy.  How to get there Abades is central between Playa de las Americas / Los Cristianos in the south and Santa Cruz in the north. By Bus: The TITSA number 111 runs to both of these destinations from Abades, via the south airport, every half an hour from 05:30 until 22:30 and then every hour or so until 04:30. By Car: Driving from Santa Cruz de Tenerife or  Los Cristianos , take the motorway TF-1, travelling time around 30 minutes.   Activities Abades is a small and tranquil fishing village hence there isn’t much to do. However, the area possesses a few interesting dive spots and not to mentioned, beautiful golden sand beach which is one of the best in the area. Why not relax on the sands with a cold drink and soak in the atmosphere? See the beach section for further details. For more various water sports and things to do, head to Los Cristianos and Playa de las Américas  where you will be spoilt with plenty of activities.   Diving Abades is one of the best places on the island to scuba dive and snorkel. It has sunshine nearly all year around and is located in a quiet yet charming part of the island, perfect for spotting some underwater life in the quiet sands.   Beaches The village of Abades’ claim to fame is its golden sand beaches. Uncommon on the island of Tenerife due to the volcanic black sand on the majority of the beaches, golden sand is a luxury and Abades has some of the best beaches for this. The beach front is picturesque with some beautiful views across the sea and whilst the rest of the village is literally just residential housing, it is worth a short trip if you are staying near to Abades to sit in the restaurant eating tapas or Paella just to soak in the views. The beach is well equipped with showers, disabled access, car parking, a few bars and restaurants, a public telephone and a fishing port.   Festivals Fiesta de Nuestra Señora del Carmen In July there is a festival in Honour of the Patron Saint of Carmen, the saint of fishermen. The main Fiesta for the Saint of Carmen is also held in Puerto de la Cruz as the traditional port. The statue is paraded and competitions such as boat races are held.   Restaurants There are a few restaurants and cafes along the beach front, many of which are the drinking hole for the local fisherman but nevertheless, offer some delicious tapas and Spanish cuisine. Restaurant Bahía de Abades The restaurant can be found on the bay of Abades, by the beach front. Address: Calle 10 de Agosto No.2, 38588 Abades, Tenerife. Telephone: +34 922 166 263 Opening Hours: Tuesdays - Saturdays, 11:30-23:00, Sundays 11:30-18:00.   Nightlife There is little to no nightlife in Abades with it being just a small village for the locals with almost no tourism. The nearest town Arico is 12km away or Güimar around 25km away. There are various bars to visit in Güimar such as the Piramid bar. About 30 minutes drive away on TF-1 motorway (or catch the Bus 111) is Los Cristianos and Playa de las Américas  where you will be spoilt for choice.   Shopping You will find a couple of supermarkets in Abades but other than this there is no shopping. The nearest town to visit to pick up souvenirs is Güimar on the north or El Médano on the south, both journeys take around 20-25 minutes drive away. Your best bet for some serious shopping however would be in the capital, Santa Cruz de Tenerife (north) or Los Cristianos / Playa de las Américas area (south), both around 30 minutes drive away on motorway TF-1.  
Overview This versatile region on the southern tip of Tenerife lends itself to discovering many aspects of island life. Whether you want to laze in the sun on one of its many golden white or volcanic black beaches, or you want to go recharge your batteries through exploring mountain villages and old churches; here away from the main tourist strips, you won't be disappointed... It's hardly surprising that this is the island's main tourism hot-spot, with its extensive choice of culinary delights (from traditional Canarian to Asian), sporting activities, festivities, shopping havens and amusement parks. It caters to every taste and makes sure everyone has something to do. An impressive array of marine, land-based, airborne flora and fauna provide a sensory experience you won't easily forget. Stunning beaches, pampering hotels, magnetic boutiques, and a refreshing mixture of Canarian and European cultures offer the ideal getaway. History Little is known of this municipality's history, which had few inhabitants when the first settlers came to this island. The earliest written records clearly identifying this area were provided by Spanish researcher José de Viera y Clavijo, but it only gained wider recognition with the building of the Saint Antonio Abad temple (later a church, and then a parish church) in the 17th century.  Its most significant period of growth took place throughout the 20th century, when tourism replaced primary sector industries, such as fishing and farming. For example, Los Cristianos was only a small coastal village with a small fishing harbour and a quarry, but has since developed into the island's biggest tourist conglomeration. This is largely due to its busy ferry port, connecting Tenerife to neighbouring islands La Gomera , La Palma , and El Hierro . Its population has continued to grow, defying harsh conditions, such as a drop in banana prices, a decline in agriculture and the Spanish civil war at beginning of the 20th Century. It has continued to develop some impressive coastal as well as mountain towns, offering a great insight into the many ways of life on Tenerife. Inhabitants and Location The 81,100 inhabitants-strong municipality of Arona, located in the southern tip of the island, has become one of the island's wealthiest areas, largely due to revenues generated from the all year- round tourism hot-spots, such as Los Cristianos (whose harbour provides access to the neighbouring islands of  La Gomera , La Palma , and El Hierro ) and Las Galletas (named after a shipwreck that took place nearby, which had plenty of biscuits, or 'galletas' on board). Its 81.79 km2 wide territory borders with Adeje to the west (separated by the awe-inspiring Barranco del Rey, or 'Canyon of the King'), Vilaflor in the north, San Miguel in the east (both split by the Las Cañadas mountain range), and ends with the southernmost point of the island, Punta Salemas. At 81.3 km distance from Santa Cruz, the region's sleepy capital village, also called Arona, with just over 1,000 inhabitants, for example, sits high up at approximately 610 meters above sea level, from where it affords splendid views onto the peaks and valleys that surround it – down onto Los Cristianos, and even Tenerife's neighbouring islands (weather permitting), and up to the cacti-clad mountain peaks reaching up towards Mt. Teide. Culture Folklore: Deeply rooted in a fusion of Guanche, Andalusian, and Hispano cultures and customs, the many colourful and lively traditional festivities are an excellent manifestation of local traditions. Festivals such as the Fiesta Virgen del Carmen clearly show the strong aboriginal influence on today's way of life. Small, African- and Caribbean-influenced orchestras, with a guitar and a tiple (a treble guitar like a ukulele) leading maracas, wooden flutes, and drums, provide the soundtrack at carnivals and fiestas. Architecture: There are few conclusive records up until the 17th century, when there was a real boost in architectural development, with the dome-like cupola representing the most important stylistic feature, appearing in the 18th century. Throughout the 19th century and 20th century, Neo-Canarian and Eclectic styles dominated the scene, with Modernism shaping the latter end of the 20th century. Traditional Art: Local arts and crafts have continued to develop in accordance to local cultural progression – however, there is still a prevailing influence of Guanche styles, most importantly where basket weaving, lacework, and ceramics were used as expressions of art. Traditional earthenware containers and bowls are direct remnants of a not-so-distant tribal past. Economy This was once a self-sufficient region thriving off its local fishing and farming industries concentrated largely around the Valley of Saint Lorenzo –keeping cattle, and producing cochineal bananas, tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, and flowers. Their importance, despite mass-exportation to the European mainland, has been overhauled by its ever-expanding tourism sector, which has employed over 60 per cent of Arona’s population since the 1980s. Largely due to the first substantial waves of Northern European, Mainland Spanish, and North American holidaymakers in the 1970s, its population has multiplied nine-fold in the past century – however, the original character of its historic town centres remains unchanged. How to get there By Bus: From Santa Cruz : to Las Galletas and Costa del Silencio - Numbers 112 (twice daily) and 115 (approximately every hour); from Los Cristianos : to Arona - Line 480 (approximately every hour); to Arona and  Vilaflor – Number 482 (three times a day).  For more information on the bus network, please visit www.titsa.com. By Car: From  Santa Cruz , take the motorway Autopista del Sur (TF-1) to the South before turning into TF-21. Activities Arona is a municipal with almost half of its territorial being surrounded by ocean. Hence, the majority of its attractions are based around the coastline especially in the Los Cristianos resort area. With its long white sand Playa de las Vista and plenty of water sports activities, boat trips, various excursions being offered, everyone will be keep amused. But don't refrain yourself within one area, there are many nearby resorts which easily accessible by car, taxi or buses. There are also a few theme parks within short distance from Arona and Los Cristianos . Other popular resorts/ areas nearby: • Playa de las Américas • Fañabé •La Caleta •Callao Salvaje • El Médano   Water sports and beach activities A wide choice of leisure options awaits visitors of Arona's multi-faceted landscape. Its coastal resorts offer a wide range of aquatic sports, such as swimming, scuba-diving, sailing, wind-surfing, jet-skiing, banana-boating, and many more. Diving and Snorkelling Diving in the South of Tenerife is diverse, offering anything from wreck dive to deep sea diving among the mysterious marine life. The volcanic coast and the calm (and warm!) water make diving a popular water sport here. There are dives and snorkelling excursions available for people of all capabilities, and diving lessons available to help those wishing to progress with their diving skills. Hiking For walkers, Arona (village) is an excellent starting and resting point for a range of hikes throughout its hinterland, the Parque Nacional de las Cañadas del Teide (Teide National Park); it offers refreshments in its various small bars and two major restaurants, the Restaurante Roque de Conde (GRAL TF – 51, No. 67), and the Restaurante Gela (c/Cementerio 15), before, in-between, or after excursions. The two walks directly accessible from here are the Camino Roque del Conde (which leads onto the Camino Barranco del Rey) and the Camino de San Antonio – which all take 2-3 hours to complete. Whale and dolphin watching The quieter inlets of the Costa del Silencio offer ample opportuniy for undisturbed relaxation, and you can even enjoy whale watching trips from the Punta de la Rasca in its pristine whale watching reserve (up to 36 species have reportedly been seen in between Tenerife and La Gomera, most commonly pilot whales, beaked whales, and sperm whales). Others For those looking for ground-based sports activities, two golf fields, eight football fields (including two with natural lawns), an Olympic-sized pool, an athletics track, and a sports arena, await you. Sights Iglesia de San Antonio Abad Of notable interest in the village of Arona itself are the typical Canary- style Church of Saint Antonio Abad (first built as a temple in 1627, before being re-built as a church in 1796, separating itself from the mother church of Vilaflor), and its adjacent town hall – located on the central Plaza Cristo de la Salud. They are both magnificent, well-preserved examples of the impressive synthesis of colonial and pre- Spanish architecture this area has to boast. It houses images of Cristo de la Salud (the Christ of Health) and the Immaculate Conception, and its high altarpiece, originating from a 17th century cloister in Adeje, is particularly noteworthy. Address: C/ Duque de la Torre, 29 38640 Arona, Tenerife . Telephone: (+34) 922 725 809 Parque Las Aguilas (Eagle Park) The Parque Las Aguilas (Eagle Park), five minutes drive out from Los Cristianos en route to Arona, which is part of the Aguilas Jungle Park, hosts a variety of 'free flight exhibitions' with large birds of prey, such as the majestic American Bald Eagle, Loud-Mouthed Eagle, the meteoritic Falcons, and gently-gliding Andean and Griffon Vultures. This experience allows visitors to experience natural habitats of not only birds of prey, but also crocodiles, monkeys, penguins, and hippos. The bus number 480 goes from Los Cristianos central station to Arona centre every 1-2 hours. Address: Urbanización Las Águilas del Teide s/n 38640 Arona, Tenerife. Telephone: (+34) 922 729 010 Museums There are no listed museums in the municipality of Arona at present. However, there are five regional cultural centres, which provide insight into local and foreign arts and literature, such as painting exhibitions. Cultural centers •Centro Cultural El Fraile (+34 922 777 006) •Centro Cultural Las Galletas (+34 922 730 446) •Centro Cultural de Los Cristianos (+34 922 757 006) •Centro Cultural de Villa Isabel (+34 922 732 304) •Centro Cultural del Valle de San Lorenzo (+34 922 765 030) Beaches Arona municipal's coastline offers over 15 kilometres of beautiful beaches, so sun-seekers can choose their preferred tanning location from some of the following beaches: Arenita 120m long, 12m wide, black sand – in Palm Mar, 2km from Los Cristianos, reachable by bus no. 467 Enojados 70m long, 30m wide, white sand – accessible on foot between El Fraile and Las Galletas Las Galletas 580m long, 30m wide, black sand, manned with a Red Cross lifeguard, accessible by car or bus – by the Las Galletas marina. Las Vistas 850m long, 127m wide, white sand, manned with a Red Cross lifeguard - Tenerife's longest beach, offering panoramic views onto La Gomera – by Los Cristianos harbour. Disability access: Las Vistas beach is fully-accessible for wheelchair users (24 hours a day, 365 days a year), including signposted reserved parking spots, easily accessible routes, entrance ramps (with two-sided handrails at two different heights, sloping at 6%), wooden pathways (2.41m wide – enough for two side-by-side), showers with fold-up seats, amphibious wheelchairs, and added security provided by lifeguards; these are managed under the EURO Key concept, which provide access to 6,700 facilities throughout the world – for more information, please see: http://www.eurokey.ch. In addition, the Spanish Red Cross provides 4 floating wheelchairs, several sets of amphibian crutches, 6 life jackets, and wooden wheelchair-accessible 100 m2 sunbathing surface – all of which can be booked free of charge by tourists and residents (available Monday- Sunday, 11am- 5pm). Los Cristianos 975m long, 40m wide, white sand, manned with a Red Cross lifegurad - a popular beach with many entertainment facilities, linked to Las Americas through Europe's longest barrier-free promenade! Festivals There is a wide range of religious and musical festivals throughout the year, attracting visitors from all over Spain, Europe and beyond. Here is a calendar of events: Pilgrimage of Saint Antonio Abad (January 17th) The pilgrimage of Saint Antonio Abad takes place on the Plaza Cristo de la Salud, whereby a mixture of traditional and modern dress is worn. Carnivals in Los Cristianos (February-March) The carnival takes place in front of the Los Cristianos Cultural Centre (near the central bus station); Salsa music is used to celebrate a certain personality or country (this changes every year and is announced around January on www.arona.org). Pilgrimage of the Virgin of Fatima (May 13th -15th) The pilgrimage of the Virgin of Fatima is held at the main square of Valle San Lorenzo; traditional or other dress is worn to traditional Canarian folkloric music. Patronage festivities in honour of the Virgin of Peace (July 8th) This festivity is held at the central Plaza in Buzanada. Fiesta La Virgen del Carmen (July 16-18th) Fiesta La Virgen del Carmen is held in Las Galletas; Christians symbolically lift the statue of the Virgin of Carmen onto a boat. International Folklore Festival International Folklore Festival (last week in July or first week in August) The International Folklore Festivalis held in Los Cristianos. Patronage Festivities in honour of the Martyr Saint Lorenzo (August 10th) Location: Plaza of Valle San Lorenzo. Saint Casiano (second-last Sunday in August) The Saint Casiano celebration is held at on the central Plaza of Las Galletas; a modern fiesta with salsa and merengue orchestras, and a miss fiesta contest. Fiesta del Carmen (first Sunday in September) Held in Los Cristianos, this modern fiesta with salsa and merengue orchestras, and the election of a beauty queen – 'La Reina de la Fiesta'. Christ of Health (Cristo de la Salud) and the Lady of the Rosary (first Sunday in October) This Romería, a procession of cow-drawn carts, with traditional dress and folkloric music, whereby a 'romera' (farm woman) – is elected, in honour of these two saints, takes place on Arona's town hall square,the Plaza Cristo de la Salud, and is Arona's most popular festival. Restaurants In the smaller towns you will encounter mainly local cuisine, although the occasional eatery serving international food is also available. In Arona, for example, the traditional Restaurante Roque de Conde (GRAL TF – 51, No. 67) serves pizzas as well as local specialities, such as an exquisite plate of Gofio (a floury paste, usually consisting of beans, bananas, and almonds); however, even at this altitude, the Restaurante La Granja (Carrettera Central TF-51 Arona-Vilaflor, No. 87) serves a wide-ranging menu of fish and seafood in a traditional setting (a few meters from the starting points of the Camino del Topo, and the Camino de Suárez walks). Nightlife There is a wide number of eating and drinking venues available throughout the municipality, whether in pedestrianised zones, shopping malls, or along the motorways (in case you need a quick break). In Los Cristianos , there is an eclectic range of British and Dutch-style bars, and European and Asian restaurants, as well as traditional Canarian ones, most of them along the main walkways – you can easily identify them through their names such as 'Churchill's Bar' or the 'Claddagh' Irish bar and plenty of flags and other decorations, if you're looking for a familiar setting.   
Tenerife , the largest and most famous of the Canary island archipelago, has an international reputation for bearing burnt Britons, boozy bars and tacky souvenirs, yet the reality stretches way beyond this over-clichéd and limited picture. Stretching over 2,000km2 and with 350km of Atlantic coastline Tenerife  is a landscape of luscious subtropical growth, volcanic rock formations which ignite the imagination more than shapes in clouds, and mountainous hiking territories, in particular the exquisite Anaga, Teno and Las Cañadas mountain ranges.  All these are centre pointed by the talismanic Mount Teide (El Teide). At 3,718 metres, it is Spain’s highest peak and the third largest volcano in the world. This geographically staggering environment is an UNESCO World Heritage Site and people flock from all around the island to hike one of its many trails or to cruise to the summit in a cable car. The black volcanic beaches are also a draw, though in the northeast coastal village of San Andrés sits Playa de las Teresitas - a man-made, urban beach with golden sands and a grand reputation. Whilst regions for nature-loving visitors also exist in the northwest and northeast, particularly in the exquisite Anaga mountain range, 900,000 (43% of the total Canary islands population) people call Tenerife  home. The significant metropolitan areas - Puerto de la Cruz , Santa Cruz de Tenerife  and Los Cristianos , Playa de las Américas and  Adeje - make up most of this, but in the background pockets of traditional life rolls on relatively unnoticed. 4.5 million tourists arrive in Tenerife  annually, most heading to resort towns of Los Cristianos , Adeje and Playa de las Américas  in the south for the blue-flagged golden sand beaches, Siam Park (Europe's largest water theme park) and plenty choices of activities and restaurants. Unsurprisingly, these areas are heavy on hotels and nightclubs, neon lights and northern Europeans sizzling in the midday sun. In the north, Puerto de la Cruz  still has a thriving tourist trade but is a haven by the south's standards; Santa Cruz de Tenerife , the island’s capital, is relatively unspoiled by the influx of other cultures but has recently seen a huge number of day visitors due to the city being a popular cruise destination. It boasts one of the world's largest carnivals, and the leisure before labour mindset of the Tinerfeños can be seen in all its Latin American pizzazz. For a more authentic Canarian feel and way of life, the historical towns of La Orotava , San Cristóbal de La Laguna and Garachico are a must. On the west of the island, the two "giants" can be checked off your 'must see' list - the huge Dragon Tree in Icod de los Vinos and the steep giant cliffs which dominates the Los Gigantes ' skyline. Throughout the constellation of villages and small towns peppered over the island, traditional holds supreme. Exotic fruits, potatoes, tomatoes and grapes (wine of  Tenerife is an unsung delight) are cultivated and exported, plenty still on family-owned holdings. Guachinches (family-run eateries serving their own produce and wines) sprouted as a result of this. 150,000 tonnes of Bananas are produced each year, making Tenerife the chief grower in the Canary Islands . The seafood trade is evident in the local diet and of course the restaurants. Weekly local markets can be visited for fresh produce and various arts and crafts. To explore further afield on the island, by foot or car, is to be guided through the island’s past. From aboriginal caves and rock inscriptions to grander houses built on the foundation of colonial rule and prosperous ties to the New World to churches and festivals dedicated to saints, it's all here, and it's all incredible. So whether sprawling on the beach, shopping and salsa dancing or scaling lonely mountainous tracks, Tenerife is sure to suit you. One thing's for sure though: there are sights, smells and history beyond the boundaries of the beaches and the boulevards of bars.
For an island that small and rocky, the variety in fauna and flora Tenerife has to offer is almost incredible. Whereas the south is rather dry and desert like, the north is lush and green right down to the coastline. All over the island, one can find beautiful spots, like the Masca gorge in the west or the Teide volcano, the island’s highlight in its center. Visitors can explore the hiking trails that cover Tenerife from coast to coast and experience the island’s numerous facets. Tenerife has many species endemic to the island, animals and plants that only exist here and that are perfectly adapted to its specific climate. One of them is the colorful Teide finch, named after the famous volcano. Another endemic bird is the Island Canary, a feral relative of the Canary, which many people hold as a pet. The colorful male is a yellowish green, whereas the female has a striped belly. The bird’s song is considered very beautiful, so listen closely for its skipping and humming tune, when exploring the island. Another endemic species is the Wet Canary Lizard, which only populates the islands Tenerife and La Palma , but can be found in great numbers here. From time to time they get all too many and will be considered a plague, hunted with traps and poison, because they can be harm to the harvest. The lizards live on plants and small insects, and won’t say no to pieces of apples fed to them by friendly tourists. There are almost no mammals on the island, apart from the forest cat that lives around Teide. Rabbits can be found to, although these were brought to the island by settlers from the mainland. There are plenty of exotic butterflies in Tenerife , due to the island’s abundance of colorful flowers. The Monarch with its red and black wings is exceptionally beautiful and can be easily spotted throughout the island. Watch out for the African Grass Blue, his bright blue wings can be seen even in garden areas of hotels. These butterflies lead a well-fed life, because of Tenerife’s  beautiful flowers. Typical for the island are the strelitzias, also known as birds of paradise, reaching for the sky with its orange blossoms. The poinsettia, or Christmas flower, which in central Europe is a common gift in Christmastime, also grows here in the wild, in big bushes. But just like the many cactuses that can be found all over the island, it was brought here from South America. When hiking through the North of the island you will find yourself in gigantic woods of Canary Island Pines. In the hotter climate of the south one will see the meaty leafs of plants belonging to the Spurge family, which are especially well adapted to the heat. One of the most spectacular features of the island’s flora are the Canary Dragon trees. A mighty example of these can be found in Icod d los Vinos in  Tenerife ’s north. 22 m high and with an estimated weight of 70t, the tree is reputed to be a thousand years old and therefore called El Drago Milenario. Almost all of the endemic species of the island are under nature protection. Although there are hardly any mammals on the island, there are a lot of them around it. In the 2000 m deep sea gate between Tenerife  and La Gomera lives the world’s biggest population of pilot whales. Many Dolphins splash about in Tenerife’s  coastal waters aswell. There are no poisonous or dangerous animals on Tenerife .
Overview Buenavista del Norte is the most North Western region of the island of Tenerife . It is quiet and tranquil, but above all else, it is beautiful. The scenery placed within this city could quite easily glide into any exotic Hollywood feature. The city has plenty of majestic sights and it even has an 18-hole golf course. While not a clubbing hotspot, this area has enough bars to keep the mild mannered tourist satisfied for an evening or two. Definitely worth a visit especially if you’re situated nearby! Buenavista del Norte is situated directly between Masca and Garachico, which is worth bearing in mind should you decide to travel here.   History Buenavista del Norte is such a pretty part of the Island, even the Spanish conquerors of old couldn’t ignore it. Consequentially, they gave the land the name it still carries today as a tribute to its beauty (Buenavista del Norte quite literally translates to ‘good view’ of the North). Retrieved historic documents suggest that this city was thriving as early as the year 1516 and if you visit the area today, you’ll find it very much the same! Reports suggest that, in the year 1513, Spanish conqueror Juan Mendéz pressed the govenment to allow him to create a village in the area of Buenavista del Norte. The superiors agreed, and Mendéz went about creating the first few houses. Before long, the area became incredibly populated and a favoured spot among the conquerors. Buenavista del Norte was officially born. Undoubtedly the area’s agricultural potential and Mendéz's seemingly endless water supply greatly contributed the area’s rapid development, but the incredible scenic views also had a part to play! Buenavista del Norte’s development also went hand in hand with the sugar cultivation exercised in the area. Recently, however, this city suffered a fairly substantial loss. In the year 1996 the Nuestra Señora de los Remedios Church was severely damaged in a fire and although it has been restored since, many priceless historical artefacts perished in the flames. Culture Buenavista del Norte is another religious city which prides itself on its historical structures. The Nuestra Señora de los Remedios Church takes centre stage in the central region of the area and commands respect from all onlookers. It’s not necessary to convert your religion and take a knee inside the church when you visit Buenavista del Norte, but you do need to be respectful of the area and of its ritualised practices. Buenavista del Norte, like many other areas in Tenerife , is a very laid back place which refuses to rush anything. Drinks may take a while longer to arrive on your table and opening hours may fluctuate, but when you experience the beauty the area has to offer you’ll find it pretty difficult to care! Economy The area of Buenavista del Norte does not heavily rely on tourist income. Hotels are not plentiful and tourist-specific attractions are few and far between. Instead, it has emerged as something of a master ‘craft’ town, with products from the area highly in demand from neighbouring lands. Buenavista del Norte’s basket making, wood works, canary knives and bone canes have achieved critical acclaim and provide the area with a certain degree of income. This area depends on its agricultural market a fair amount. Banana plantations in Buenavista del Norte are plentiful and they generate a sustainable amount of income for the area. The area also harvests potatoes and tomatoes, and the cattle breeding industry here is important for the locals. Although rare, Buenavista del Norte does have some attractions specifically built and designed for tourists. The most prolific of these types of attractions can be seen in the shape of Buenavista del Norte Golf course. This attraction entices many foreigners to visit the area and it, too, can be seen as a source of income for the area. How to get there By Bus: TITSA bus 107 runs from Santa Cruz all the way to Buenavista del Norte every 2 hours. The town is the last stop on this service too, so it’s pretty difficult to get lost in all honesty. There is a big gap from the 13:15 to the 17:15 buses though so be aware. If you’re coming from the West then the 355 bus is probably your best bet. This bus also runs every couple of hours and the first one in line leaves at 06:45 in the morning. If you’re travelling from Puerto de la Cruz then the bus to take is the 363. This bus departs the city every hour, from 06:00 in the morning to 22:00 at night. Buenavista del Norte is also the last stop of this service. By Car: If you travel by car then things are a lot simpler. If coming from the south, just follow signs for Autopista Norte TF-5 and turn off onto that motorway when you get a chance. Then, travel to the end of the TF-5 and follow signs to Icod de los Vinos, Garachico and eventually, Buenavista del Norte. This will lead you onto the TF-20 and TF-42A roads, which are smaller than the TF-5 Autopista. If you’re travelling from the North, it’s advisable to simply follow the same route.     Sights From towering churches to scenic 18 hole golf courses, Buenavista del Norte has more on offer than first meets the eye. Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de los Remedios (Church) The Nuestra Señora de los Remedios church is a stunningly intimidating structure, which was erected in the 16 th century. There has been much renovation to the building since its inception, especially after the tragic fire of 1996, which destroyed the majority of the church along with many priceless artefacts. The church houses a very beautiful, yet sullen, atmosphere and sees locals visiting regularly to pay their respects. Address: Plaza de Nuestra Señora de los Remedios, s/n, 38480 Buenavista del Telephone: 922 127 027 Punta de Teno (Parque Rural de Teno) Located on the West coast of Tenerife  just past Buenavista del Norte, is a beautiful stretch of scenery by the name of Punta de Teno. The views in the area of Teno are truly breathtaking. Sky-scraping mountains ethereally dance with the clouds at your very feet and on a clear day, you can even see the island of  La Palma from up here! There’s also a very old (created in 1895) and a fairly new (1976) lighthouse located on this pretty stretch of coast.     Museums Museum and Craft Centre, Buenavista del Norte This museum is located in Masca , a region in the southern area of Buenavista del Norte, and it once resided as the home of a local. As you would expect, it’s not big, but it certainly offers an interesting insight into the rich history and culture of the area. Alternatively, if you prefer your museums to be a bit larger, you could always take a quick trip to Puerto de la Cruz . Puerto is located on the North coast of the island and it plays host to a whole range of different museums and galleries.     Activities Buenavista del Norte Golf Course If you fancy testing out your golf swing then this is a great place to do it. With 18 holes, all year round sun and a lot of beautiful scenery, Buenavista del Norte golf course is a dream come true for any avid golfer. The course has a par of 72 and a length of over 6,000 metres. Rules dictate that men have, at least, a handicap of 28 and women a handicap of 36, to compete on the course. Direction: leaving Buenavista del Norte town heading towards the main road, take Autopista TF-445 heading west and follow the signs at the roundabout. Telephone: (+34) 922 129 034 Opening hours: Open 365 days a year, summer opening hours 09:00 to 20:00. Fees: Greenfees range from €22 to €76. Web: www.Buenavista del Nortegolf.es     Beaches La Masca Beach Located at the end of Masca Valley is La Masca Beach. Like many of Tenerife ’s beaches, the sand in this area is black due to ancient volcanic activity. This, of course, implies that it is wise to stay clear of the beach between the peak hours of overhead sun, as the sand will undoubtedly reach unbearable temperatures. At approximately 400metres long and 15metres wide, La Masca beach is relatively large, and this, coupled with the area’s isolated nature, means that finding space will rarely be a problem. You can gain access to this beach via boat, or alternatively, a 4-kilometre hike. Both sound slightly tenuous, but when you experience the calm, crisp water that La Masca has to offer, you’ll think it was worth every step…(or wave). Beaches around Punta de Teno area Buenavista del Norte has many other beaches on its coast too, most notably the pretty, modest beach located on the Punta de Teno stretch and the beach by the Buenavista del Norte golf course. Both of these beaches are very easy on the eye and deserve to be explored.     Restaurants Restaurante La Cabaña La Cabaña is located in the city centre and attracts many locals and tourists alike. Fresh fish is the main specialty here, but the poultry dishes are well worth a try too. Address: Calle del Puerto, 26, 38480 Buenavista del Norte, Tenerife . Telephone: (+34) 922 127 050 Average price: €15, menu of the day €8.50. El Burgado This restaurant offers a pleasant atmosphere at a very reasonable price. The kitchen here serves up a fantastic range of fresh fish which must be tried! This restaurant is 2km (about 5 minutes drive) away from Buenavista town centre, via Autopista TF-445. Address: Camino del Rincón Playa Las Arenas, 38480 Buenavista, Tenerife . Telephone: 922 127 831     Nightlife Bars in Buenavista del Norte are plentiful, but if you’re looking to dance all your troubles away in a club until the early hours of the morning, then you’re better off taking a short bus trip to Puerto de la Cruz . Listed below are some examples of local bars which are worth a try! Bar Pilón A very tranquil bar, perfect for those looking to relax and get away from it all. Music is sometimes played through loudspeakers in the evening, however this is limited to love songs of the Spanish variety. €5 here will be more than enough for some food and drink! Address: Bar Pilón. Pl. Remedios, 13 , 38480 Buenavista del Norte del Norte, Tenerife . Bar Plaza la Cruz A slightly livelier bar than the rest, most probably due to its offer to screen live football matches on a near daily basis! €5 in here will set you up with a nice cold beer and some very tasty Spanish food. Address: Plaza General Eulate, 8, 38480 Buenavista del Norte del Norte, Tenerife . Shopping Buenavista del Norte is crammed with shops selling a range of local produce and there’s a supermercado every couple of hundred metres, so buying food will hardly ever be a problem. If you’re looking to get your hands on something branded though, you’d be better off travelling to the neighbouring Icod de los Vinos , which has a range of stylish shops available!