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Popular things to do in La Gomera

Private Charter Boat Excursion to Los Órganos, La Gomera
Private Charter Boat Excursion to Los Órganos, La Gomera
Private Charter Boat Excursion to Los Órganos, La Gomera 4 hours
Hop on a private charter boat excursion to explore the stunning organ-like cliff face of Los Órganos of La Gomera - one of the star attractions of the island. Ideal for couple, group of friends and family. Children under 5 free.
Price from: €200.00
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Private charter fishing trip in La Gomera
Private charter fishing trip in La Gomera
Private charter fishing trip in La Gomera 4 hours
Enjoy 4 hours of relaxing fishing trip around the waters of San Sebastian of La Gomera. This private boat charter takes up to 5 adults with itinerary to suit your preference. Ideal for group of friends sharing similar interest.
Price from: €250.00
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Private charter boat tour - whale watching in La Gomera
Private charter boat tour - whale watching in La Gomera
Private charter boat tour - whale watching in La Gomera 4 hours
Join us on a private charter boat tour for you and up to 4 others. The itinerary is yours to create. Spot whales and dolphins or swim and snorkel in remote coves . Ideal for couple, group of friends and family. Children under 5 free.
Price from: €200.00
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Tour and activity categories in La Gomera

Private charter
Private charter

Travel Inspirations - La Gomera

The second-smallest island of the Canaries, La Gomera has many qualities which make it a must-see island to visit. Its authentic villages, beautiful beaches, stunning gorges, and welcoming locals are just a few reasons to see the island. Perhaps the landscape, culture and history of La Gomera  can best be reflected in La Gomera 's special whistling language, known as 'El Silbo'. This, the only means of communication like it on the planet, has been written about since Roman times, and helped the natives defy the Spanish conquistadors in the 15th century. It was adopted by the settlers though, and since the turn of the century has been on the primary school syllabus. For La Gomera 's 20,000 inhabitants and their forefathers, such a language would have been crucial in order to negotiate the island's circular landmass, cut through by deep ravines (or barrancos) and valleys. Be it the weather, marriage, new life, death or the price of a goat, they had whistled words to describe it. That very same landmass is now an adventure playground for walkers. From the 1,487 metre high of Garajonay mountain, which wears a permanent headband of cloud and mist, to the national park surrounding it, there are many hiking trails of varying length and difficulty. The jungle-like expanse near the top which catches the moisture from the trade winds juxtaposes the heat of the cliffs towards the ocean. This Atlantic island, which still remains largely unaffected by tourism, is a true paradise for active and sporty holidaymakers. Fascinating dive trips, spectacular mountain bike tours, and excellent beaches around the island make La Gomera an ideal holiday destination. You won't be limited to just the summer seasons, as temperatures in the Canaries are mild all year round. The tourist haven Valle Gran Rey , the capital San Sebastián, the fishing village Playa de Santiago, and the northerly region of Vallehermoso are just some of the recommended destinations while travelling around the island. Altogether, La Gomera is an unspoilt and authentic Canary island appealing to those who want to relax, as well as those who seek a more active holiday. Families, couples, and single travellers in search of an untouched piece of nature will also enjoy the island. How to get there: As it sits in Tenerife 's shadow, a majority of visits to La Gomera are via a 40-minute ferry ride from the larger island. La Gomera , along with El Hierro , doesn't accommodate flights from mainland Europe but just a few from within the Canary Islands . Arriving by boat and not commercial aircraft helps retain the sense of mystery you'll undoubtedly feel when setting foot on La Gomera ; the slow swagger of life will stay with you even when on hikes or drives.  
Overview: Located along the northern coast of La Gomera island, Agulo can be reached via a country road which runs through Hermigua Valley. One of the oldest villages on the island, it is often regarded as the prettiest, and bears the name “El Balcon Verde” (the green balcony). Situated on a platform above the sea, in front of an imposing red cliff face, Agulo is divided into three main parts: La Montañeta, Las Casas, and El Charco. The village comprises of picturesque cobbled streets and quaint narrow houses surrounded by vegetable gardens. In the centre, there is a church and a few old houses resembling beautiful examples of traditional Canarian architecture. From the village, you can also see the top of Mount Teide, situated in the neighbouring island of Tenerife . In the upper part of the municipality, agriculture and farming dominate the scene, but exists harmoniously alongside rural tourism. Holiday-makers are consequently offered a unique natural environment. History Agulo was founded by a group of 20 settlers in 1607. The population has grown steadily ever since, and there are now 1200 inhabitants. Notably, a catastrophe took place in this small town in 1770, when heavy rainfall displaced the historic centre of El Charco. However, in the early 20th century, the beginning of banana growing raised the level of prosperity. Sights: Sights in Agulo are not exactly very concentrated. The village of Agulo itself navigable on foot, you can take visit the church or chill out at its atmospheric plaza. Venturing further, it is advisable that you rent a car. Following motorway TF-711 towards Vallehermoso , you will find a visitor centre, a restaurant offering Silbo Gomero (ancient whistling) demonstration, and a mirador (vantage point). Iglesia de San Marcos (church) and Plaza de Leoncio Bento (square) This white parish church boasts neo-gothical architecture. It was built by architects, Pintor and Ocete. In 1911, the church was torn down due to its grave state of disrepair, but was thereafter re-built. There are a few features within the church's worth noting, one of them is the figure of Christ, by the artist Pérez Donis. The church fits perfectly on the Plaza de Leoncio Bento (square), which was named after the most prominent supporter of its construction. Surrounded by old Canarian houses with carved wooden balconies, this atmospheric plaza is worth lingering over. Every April, the annual festival in honour of San Marcos is held on the main street surrounding the plaza. During this time, Agulo is transformed into a magical place, with traditional fires being set alight and the village’s men jump over them as a test of bravery. Juego de Bola visitor centre If you would like to find out more about the Parque Nacional de Grarajonay (National Park), head to Juego de Bola visitor centre. This visitor centre offers a wealth of information on flora and fauna, geology, climate, and flora and fauna of the park. Comprehensive maps, hiking guides, and guided tours of the park (on Saturdays) are also available. For the guided tour, it is advisable that you phone and book in advance. A handicraft museum/ shop also forms part of this centre. To get there, take motorway TF-711 from Agulo heading northwards to Rosas and Vallehermoso . Just before Rosas, you will see sign post pointing to the visitor centre, turn left and follow signs. Address: Centro de Visitantes "Juego de Bolas" La Palmita, Agulo, La Gomera island. Telephone: +34 922 800 993 Opening hours: 09:30 - 16:30 Silbo Gomero (ancient whistling demonstration) There is a restaurant in Agulo offering lunch deal with a demonstration of Silbo Gomero (ancient whistling language). From here, you can take in the beautiful views of Mount Teide ( Tenerife island) on a clear day. Do book in advance as the restaurant can get very busy with tour buses arriving with big groups of tourists. Address: Restaurante Las Rosas, Rosas, Agulo, La Gomera island. Follow motorway TF-711 northwards heading towards Vallehermoso . Telephone: +34 922 800 916 Opening hours: Monday - Saturday, 12:30 to 15:15 Mirador Roque Blanco (vantage point) Head to this vantage point for gorgeous view over looking the Roque Blanco's valley and part of El Teón (Vallehermoso). There is also a restaurant bearing the same name offering delicious Canarian fare. Direction: From Agulo, take motorway TF-711 towards the direction of Rosas and Vallehermoso . Exit for Rosas village and continue on its main street Calle Cruz de Tierno a El Lomo de Sibrián before turning right onto Calle de la Cruz de Tierno, follow the signs. Address: Cruz de Tierno, Agulo, La Gomera island. Group of Houses Caserío de Lepe If you are heading south to Hermigua on motorway TF-711, don't forget to look out for Caserio de Lepe: a group of beautiful houses at the foot of the steep cliff face, surrounded by banana fields. It belongs to the municipal of Agulo, but is actually more closely connected to Tabaibal , as it is only accessible via the beach road from there. Direction: when in  Tabaibal on Carretera General/TF-711, turn left for Santa Catalina and follow the beach road.
Overview: The municipality Alajeró, is located on the south western coast of La Gomera island. It largely comprises of the Playa de Santiago holiday resort, and is also the home of the islands’ small airport.   Located in the dry south, this region is surrounded by cliffs with arid lands, upon which almond trees and traditional houses are scattered. This little place is also called “The Balcony over the Atlantic”. It is here that you can find a wonderful palm grove, as well as settlement called El Paso, famous for its Romería, a traditional fair. Owing to its sea birds, the steep slopes are a nature reserve which is classed as a place of scientific interest. Economy Fishing and agricultural activities are very important in Alajeró, with tourism also playing a prominent role. Sights: Located in a historical part of the island, there are various churches that are worth seeing during your visit. Iglesia del Salvador del Mundo Church The Iglesia del Salvador del Mundo, the church of the world's saviour, is a must see. Dating back to 1512, it boasts a dark panelled bell-tower, as well as a wooden figure of Christ in its interior. High laurel trees garnish its beautiful church yard. Nuestra Señora del Buen Paso Chapel The pilgrimage chapel of Nuestra Señora del Buen Paso, is situated around three kilometres above Alajeró. A big celebration is held here every year on the 15 th of September, in honour of its namesake. During this time, lovers of the islands traditional pilgrimages, unite at the chapel to the melodies of castanets and drums. Hermitage of St Laurence, and La Caldera Another sight of interest is the Hermitage of St. Laurence, above the Erques gorge. In addition, Alajeró possesses the island's only volcanic peak, La Caldera, as well as the oldest dragon tree, the Drago of Agalán, which stands in a lonely side valley near Alajeró. This tree can be viewed while walking along a levelled, well-signposted pathway. Beaches: Playa de Santiago  Lying in the deep south of La Gomera , the small fishing village of Playa de Santiago, which belongs to Alajeró, is spoilt in terms of sunshine. In the past, fish processing was the central industry here, but today tourism provides its main income. Visitors and locals alike enjoy the quiet atmosphere of this quaint little town. It has developed vastly over the years, partly due to the nearby airport, and also because of the many luxury hotels that have been built recently. Nonetheless, the harbour area has been able to maintain a little of its sleepy charm. The central point of Playa de Santiago is the Plaza del Carmen, a lively square which is the meeting point for the locals. From here, there is a small promenade, by the harbour, which has various bars and restaurants. Here, you can enjoy typical Canarian cuisine. The main beach of Playa Santiago starts at the harbour, continues along the promenade, and ends at the Club Laurel of the Hotel Jardin Tecina. The harbour mole protects the 500 meter long section of the beach in the harbour, in front of the surge. Here, bathers can safely enter the western part of the beach.
Overview: Situated on the north eastern coast of La Gomera Island, Hermigua is a paradise for nature lovers. There are many rural residences and small hotels on this part of the island, providing you with an authentic take on Canarian life. The emblem of the municipality are the characteristic twin cliffs, Roques de San Pedro, which are an old volcano furnace near Monteforte. The main attraction however, is the settlement of El Credo, which lies in the largest evergreen forest on the island. Along with stunning natural scenery, there are also historical churches, ethnographic museum handicraft, and gofio mill museum. The coastline boasts a beautiful beach, a natural swimming pool and several concrete pillars rising out of the sea, remainders of what used to be the loading station of Hermigua. History The valley of Hermigua was first inhabited by the Gomeros, the aborigines of the Canary Islands . The village of Valle Alto was established in the 16th century, and later became known as Hermigua. Location and Vegetation Hermigua is one of the six municipalities on the island. It lies in the northeast of La Gomera , and you can reach this picturesque village on the northward road from San Sebastián. Your eyes will meet a spectacular, fertile green valley, through which you can drive down before you reach the beach around the Santa Catalina. Bananas are Hermigua’s main export, along with wine and vegetables, which are mostly produced for the consumption of the island’s inhabitants. The trade winds give the small village an extraordinary climate. The area was even awarded the title of “Best Climate of the World” by an international meteorological committee. Economy Hermigua’s heritage is rooted deeply in agriculture. As early as the 16th century, sugar cane was cultivated here. The sugar cane production, among other things, brought economic wealth which caused the population to surge. The year-round water supply from the Rio del Cedro means that it is very fertile here, this is vital to how Hermigua sustains itself agriculturally today. Aside from tourism, the municipality maintains its economy through growing potatoes, papayas, bananas, wheat, pumpkins, beans, and grapes. Sights: Hermigua municipal has something for everyone. While nature lovers and hikers are drawn towards its inland for lush forest; the villages itself convey an authentic Gomeran feel. There are also historical churches, ethnographic museum handicraft, and gofio mill museum. On the coastline, you can witness the old concrete pillars from the dismantled El Pescante (cranes), which adds to a particular charm to its surrounding. El Cedro This rural settlement lies in the greatest evergreen forest of the Canary Islands . Though belonging to the Hermigua municipality, it is situated at the edge of the Garajonay National Park, next to a stream, which has running water all year round. The steadily flowing water of the stream comes from the Monteverde forest area, towards Hermigua. The previous inhabitants of this forest used to collect wood to make charcoal. Craft making was also a great past time for these people while plants with healing are used to make herbal teas. Nowadays, the exquisite plants, lush forest and beautiful waterfall (Caidero de la Boca Chorro) makes El Cedro a nature lovers' playground. If you wish to linger a little longer, there is a camping ground (Camping La Vista) and a few cottages available for rent. From Hermigua you can drive southwestward on TF-711, taking the right turn into Calle del Rejo la Zarcita, followed by another right turn into Calle del Rejo la Zarcita. This 17km journey on a zigzag road takes about half an hour but if you have 3 hours to spare, the circular hiking route number 6 from Hermigua is highly recommended. During this walk you will be rewarded with breathtaking view over the Hermigua valley and laurel forest, refreshing waterfall, and a chance to pop into the chapels of Nuestra Señora de Lourdes and San Juan for a visit. Iglesia de Santo Domingo Guzmán (Church) Constructed in the 16th century, this ex-convent contains delicate Mudéjar ceiling and various baroque altarpieces and images. Located on the upper valley (older part) of Hermigua, the church is the focal point for many of the town's religious celebrations, namely Fiesta de Santo Domingo Guzmán. Where: Calle Convento s/n, 38820 Hermigua, La Gomera island. Ethnographic Museum and Los Telares Handicraft Centre Located in an old manor house, this ethnology museum is simultaneously a handicraft centre. The building stood empty for 50 years, and was converted into a museum by Marua Gámez in 1984. Inside, there are five ancient weaving machines in the room located under the handicraft shop. The actual museum lies in another wing of the manor house, where visitors can look at a wide range of antiquities, household objects, and agricultural tools. Also on display are collectibles by the founder of the museum, which include a typical mortar from La Gomera island, grinders, coffee cookers, and bread dough baskets. Where: Carretera General 99, Las Hoyetas, 38820 Hermigua, La Gomera island. Gofio Mill Museum This museum, housed in a reconstructed gofio (a typical Canarian flour made of mixed grains) mill, gives you an idea as to how this staple food of the Canarian is produced. After touring the museum, you can taste and purchase some gofio to take home as gifts for friends and family. Where: Carretera General s/n, 38820 Hermigua, La Gomera island. Telephone: +34 922 880 781 Opening hours: 10:00 to 17:00, Monday to Saturday Admission fee: €3 Iglesia de la Encarnación (Church) Located at the lower valley, this beautiful yellow church stands proud in the newer part of Hermigua. The construction of this church began in the 17th century, however due to its collapse in 1711, the reconstruction did not complete until first quarter of the 20th century. Inside the church you can marvel at the wooden statue of the Virgin of Encarnación, sculpted by Fernando Estévez in 1819. Where: Plaza de la Encarnación, 38820 Hermigua, La Gomera island. Old Crane/ El Pescante Due to the increasing growth of banana clusters in the beginning of the 20th century, the trading company La Unión began the construction of a davit with a capital of 70,000 pesetas. The goal was to be able to ship and sell the yields of the surrounding fertile valleys. Several years later, in 1923, a further investment of 300,000 pesetas was made on another davit with a height of 150 metres. The beginning of commerce at the nearby harbour of San Sebastián, however, rendered the davits obsolete. The metal structure of these was deconstructed and sold in 1957 and today, only the  towering concrete pillars of the former ocean loading station remain. On the left hand side of El Pescante is a natural salt water swimming pool. This pool is unfortunately closed to public access indefinitely since 2008. Last update: February 2011- works to ensure access to the natural pool and Pescante Hermigua is now included in the Strategy for Public Space Tourist beautification. Beaches: The coastline offers a beautiful beach, a natural swimming pool and concrete pillars rising out of the sea- remainders of what used to be the loading station of Hermigua. Playa de la Caleta (beach) Playa de La Caleta is one of the best beaches on the northern region of La Gomera . It boasts fine volcanic black sands and pebbles. Basic amenities such as toilet and shower are available. Natural salt water pool This natural salt water pool is a true delight for the locals, and tourists who knows about it. It can be found on the left of the Old Crane/ El Pescante , where concrete pillars of what used to be the ocean loading station of Hermigua stick out from the sea. Bizarre as they might be, these pillars contribute to the unique scenery to be enjoyed while taking a refreshing dip in the pool. *This pool is unfortunately closed to public access indefinitely since 2008. Last update received on February 2011- works to ensure access to the natural pool and Pescante Hermigua is now included in the Strategy for Public Space Tourist beautification.
Overview: History Since the beginning of the 15 th Century, when the island's conquest to the inclusion into the Kingdom of Castile took place, San Sebastian has been the political and administrative capital of the island. The historic centre of this place has undergone ongoing growth throughout 500 years of its moving history: from a gorge to a protected bay, and up to today's modern quay, which enables this modern entry gate to this place, as well as the entire island. In the beginning, San Sebastián was a small settlement, whose founders not only possessed a protected bay for sailing ships, but also access to fresh water. They could therefore supply water from the springs to the ships, which still provided water with the help of mills and bucket wheels. The first houses were built directly by the beach, with a main road called Calle del Medio, which translates as “The Middle Road”. The little town of San Sebastián has left behind interesting remnants of its past, such as monuments designed to bring the religious, political, social, and military occurrences of the past 500 years closer to the visitors. Location and Vegetation The Gomeran capital lies in the south east of the island. There is wind shadow here, and it is mainly dry with barren shrubs. The temperatures here are higher, with a yearly average of 22°C. San Sebastián is the first place you reach coming from the sea. The large commercial harbour is steered at by passenger ships from Tenerife, La Palma, and El Hierro. Cruise ships from all over Europe dock at this harbour. Visitors will find quiet beaches with fine sand and natural landscapes worth a walk. For example, the Majona Nature Park, the Chejelipes Gorge, and Puntalla, where the hermitage of the island's patron saint, Our Lady Guadalupe, is found. Economy The economy of San Sebastián is today mainly determined by its function as capital and harbour. The service sector plays an important role, particularly in relation to transport, trade, and tourism. How to get there There are currently no bus routes to the beach which means to get there, you have to either travel by taxi, or independently by car. There are several vehicle-friendly trails which fork off the FV-2 motorway, which lead to the coastline. If heading from Puerto del Rosario airport, the journey should take approximately 45 minutes. Sights: Pilgrimage Church of Saint Sebastián This simple and humble construction is one of town's first churches dating back to 1540. The final completion, however, was only in 1674. Once you have entered the circular arch by the main entrance, you stand inside the 11 metre-long and 5 metre-wide ship with a chapel, which again lies behind a circular arch. Address: Calle Real, 38800 San Sebastián de La Gomera Church of La Asunción Located close to the sea, however not having been endangered by earlier flooding, is this place's most important house of God, the Asunción Church. It was constructed on the remains of an old pilgrimage church, and hides rich treasures behind its walls. Among these are the Mudejar table works, wood sculptures, and various paintings and drawings, such as the “Christ at the Cross” by Luján Pérez, whose most recent restoration was completed in 1988. Christopher Columbus prayed for the final time in the old church, before embarking on the crossing of the seas. However, this past church is no longer in existence. Today, the church offers visitors a different image of this house of God, as was foreseen by the constructor Hernán Peraza El Joven. Due to the constant pirate attacks during the 16 th and 17 th Century, this small town and its Asunción Church were levelled to the ground several times. Today, the church represents a harmonious fusion  of Mudejar, Gothic, and Baroque influences. It features a facade with a central body for the main entrance with red chalkstone and two white stone side doors. Address: Calle del Tanquito, 13, 38800 San Sebastian De La Gomera Telephone: +34 922 870 303 The Earl's Tower (Torre del Conde) The Earl's Tower is the most important remaining example of military architecture of the Canary Islands. It suffered under the attacks of the Corsairs, but could do little in the way of protecting this place, since it had been constructed to withstand uprisings by the islanders, rather than preventing the landing of less peacefully intent Berbers, English, and Dutch forces. The constructor Hernán Peraza thought in 1450, in the middle of the invasion process of the town centre, more of local attacks, than of the dangers from the sea. Address: Calle de Ruiz de Padrón, 19, 38800 San Sebastián de La Gomera The Lighthouse of Saint Christopher (Faro de San Cristóbal) If you drive from San Sebastián towards Puntallana near the coast, on your right you will find a road of only a few hundred metres length (Camino del Faro), which leads to a beautiful lighthouse, that of Saint Christopher. This not only consist of one, but actually of two towers. The first lighthouse still rises through the ceiling of the old and well-maintained tenement of the lighthouse warden, which is small, but attractive due to its simplicity. Its vane follows the wind from its high view point above the headland. Behind the old lighthouse and the tenement, the  new, more robust lighthouse of Saint Christopher was erected. Museums: Columbus Museum (Museo Casa de Colón) The “Columbus House” contains an important archaeological collection from the North of Peru, featuring pieces from the 8 th to the 16 th Century, mainly belonging to the Chimú culture. Inside this house, which used to belong to the Earl and was used for water supply purposes, you can find the Aguada Spring. It was here that Columbus provided his ships with fresh water prior to the crossing into the New World, which is why this spring is also known as Columbus Spring (Pozo de Colón). Address: Calle Real,56, 38800 San Sebastián de La Gomera Archaeological Museum This museum introduces us to the culture of the old “Gomeros” (inhabitants of La Gomera). It is also a centre for cultural exploration, distribution, and promotion, which is the basis for its monument protection. Address: Calle Real, 38800 San Sebastián de La Gomera Activites: San Sebastian is the entry point to the island via sea, its marina is the departure point for the many water activities and boat excursions. Hop on a boat trip to explore the stunning coastline and landscapes of the island, spot dolphins and whales, fishing or perhaps explore the intriguing underwater and sea creature this untouched island possesses. Several hiking and jeep tours also depart from this capital city of La Gomera. Beaches: Playa de San Sebastián The harbour mole preventing a high wave swell enables untroubled bathing. Sunbathing on the black lava sand beach is also a delight. This beach offers bathing fun for the whole family, as it even offers a children's playground. Playa de Cueva This beach behind the cliffs at the harbour of San Sebastián is particularly well-maintained. Wave breakers protect bathers from strong surf on the 250 metre-long beach. There is a beautiful restaurant here, where you can sit outside and enjoy a wonderful view onto the sea and the rocky coastline. Playa de la Guancha High above the sea lies this lonely beach, situated south west of San Sebastián. An approximately 1.5 hour-long mountain path leads to the Playa de la Guancha. From here you have an outstanding view on the neighbouring island Tenerife and the atmosphere is unique. Playa Abalo If you drive along the country road signposted Lomo del Clavo towards Puntallana, this will take you to the Abalo beach. The bay of this beach leads into a deep gorge, whose end section transforms itself into a palm oasis before descending into the sea. Here, visitors can encounter a peaceful environment and clear, green water between the steep cliffs broken up by the gorge, to one side, and a deep-blue horizon to the other. Shopping: There are several beautiful terrace cafés on the centrally-located Plaza de la Constitution. In the shade of Indian laurel trees you can encounter locals and craftsmen on a farmer's market on Wednesdays and Saturdays, who sell their homemade jams, fresh fruits, mojo sauces, cheeses, typical pastries, and vegetables, as well as other delicacies. But even on days without markets, the capital of La Gomera offers shops for all requirements: clothing, shoes, sportswear, and many small supermarkets. Behind, and partially even under, the bus station (Estación de Guaguas, there is a large supermarket with a big selection. In front of it, there are many stalls selling fresh fish, vegetables, bread, flowers, and other foodstuffs.
Overview: Tabaibal is a small village which lies northeast of the La Gomera island. Belonging to the municipality of Hermigua , this quaint hamlet offers a splendid ocean landscape, as it is located 150 meters above sea level. Nature lovers can embark on hiking trips, taking in the stunning views of the village’s famous banana plantations. Cycling is also a great way to explore the area. There is a natural swimming pool for those wanting a splash or swim on a hot sunny day. For those in need of peace and quiet, or just want a relaxing holiday, there are many casas rurales (rural houses) available for rent. Most of these houses come with incredible views of the banana plantations and the Atlantic sea.